”We content creators have been too slow to react to the free exploitation of news by third parties without input or permission…

We will no longer tolerate the disconnect between people who devote themselves — at great human and economic cost — to gathering news of public interest and those who profit from it without supporting it…

I’m not saying Google’s an enemy, all right?…

I think we stand at an enviable moment where Microsoft and Google have decided to go to war, and we who produce content can start to figure out whether there’s an opportunity for us to help that sharing in a way that reverses the outflow of money from media and takes it back…

if you don’t agree to our protocols, if you don’t agree to give us real-time metrics, we aren’t going to work with you…

I said, this time is different…

I’m not talking about Google. [1] We haven’t talked. [2] We haven’t talked.  [3] We haven’t talked with them in any serious way.

Tom Curley, CEO of the AP in Asia, which will be testing the news registry in a matter of weeks

The aggregators and plagiarists will soon have to pay a price for the co-opting of our content. But if we do not take advantage of the current movement toward paid content, it will be the content creators — the people in this hall — who will pay the ultimate price and the content kleptomaniacs who triumph

Rupert Murdoch, CEO News Corp, at the World Media Summit in Beijing.

In our specific case, the global nature of the Internet and the ability of search engines to quickly aggregate and distribute content has posed the most serious challenge to our business

Adrian Dickson, managing editor for Asia for ThomsonReuters

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